6/24/07

Rules for non-bedside nurses

We are very concerned about the nursing shortage in
America, if the paperwork nurses actually did some nursing, no shortage would exist.

1. Nurses that do not provide direct patient care on a daily basis should not develop policies for nurses that do. (Have you ever noticed how the policies for your nursing practice are written without any input from the people who have to carry out the policies?)

2. Nurses that do not provide direct patient care on a daily basis should not develop forms for nurses that do. (that way a nurse won't have to waste her time putting the VS on the flow sheet and the graphics form and a report sheet etc. etc. etc.)

3. Nurses that do not provide direct patient care on a daily basis should not represent nurses that do in any advertising portraying them as bedside nurses. If you don't do the job, you don't get to claim the glory. ( I don't know about you but I've never seen any of the people who are portrayed as nurses at my hospital or they are all directors and QRM people.)

4. Nurses that do not provide direct patient care on a daily basis should not ever speak for those that do. (It is not OK for QRM to tell admin that the ER nurses should do audits on every patient to see if they meet admission criteria.)

5. Nurses that do not provide direct patient care on a daily basis should not develop staffing guidelines since they have no clue how much work is involved in caring for patients in today's world, including filling out the myriad redundant forms developed by the nurses that do not provide direct patient care on a daily basis. (don't tell us we don't need tech's when you haven't worked at the bedside in 20 years.)

6. Nurses that do not provide direct patient care on a daily basis should not ever have a place on any committee or governmental agency that develop policy or have oversight over nurses that do. (JCAHO etc. needs to have practicing nurses so that someone can tell them how idiotic their policies are and help them actually do some good.)

7. All nursing staff should be required to perform clinical shifts on a regular basis so that they don't lose their skills which may be needed in times of surge capacity and so that they don't forget how hard nurses have to work.

If this sounds a bit bitter, it probably is. Thanks to the non-practicing nurses I now spend more than half my time filling out redundant forms rather than be at the bedside with my patient.

3 comments:

  1. Oh God, LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE LIKE. I wish I had the balls to post this in our bathroom at work.

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  2. Get a grip. I certainly respect the bedside nurses. I was one for 20 years, give or take, but I didn't get a break during my shift either. I had 65 patients to find post-discharge "homes" for in 10 hours, and I was the one who audited your patients' charts to make sure that you and the doctor actually filled out those forms that would get us all paid. So if you don't want those same patients sitting in your ER beds for the next three days, please leave the poor "non-bedside" nurse case manager a little space at the station, and let us get our job done, too.

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  3. "If this sounds a bit bitter, it probably is."

    Yeah, you seemed bitter here, eh. Though there are some truth on what you are saying. One cannot judge a job, if that is not your career.

    Thanks for sharing,
    Peny@Know More about the Prostate Cancer Test

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