10/31/11

Employment in Hospitals - California

How many jobs were there in hospitals over the coarse of the past 10 years? A prudent question to ask to see, among other things, whether funding for hospitals has declined, whether the recession has had an impact on the health sector, and how many are employed in the hospital sector.

I pulled up some stats for the nation's largest state, California, and got numbers in excess of 300,000. Since 2000 the number employed in Californian hospitals (not just nurses and doctors) rose 25% from around 315,000 in 2000 to 379,000 last month in 2011.

The sector did experience a loss of jobs in the 2010 period as did pretty much every other industry in the state. Population took a downward spiral during that time as well (all stemming from the 2008 crash.)

Check out this graph from 2000 to 2011 showing number of employed persons in the hospital sector.




So this data is another example of how essential services remain mostly recession proof. Or put another way, there are job opportunities in Californian hospitals. Next post I'll show the relation to employment in Californian hospitals and population.


Data compiled by San Diego Bankruptcy Lawyers derived from RAND.

10/26/11

Nurses Intuition

Nurses develop knowledge, skills, and clinical judgment all of which are accented by experience and reflection. But sometimes you just go with your gut. Now, you may not treat based on your gut, but you may adjust your testing procedures to find a or solve an issue you think is there.

How many of you have stories about your 'nurses intuition' in action?

10/16/11

Technology in the ER - Do Smartphones Hurt Care?

Honest question: are you fiddling on your smartphone phone/ phone at work? Texting in the corner? Checking out the news or Facebook? Facebook on a computer anywhere?

The advent of cheap data and smartphones with snazzy bells and whistles means you can easily get lost in something more interesting than boring patients. OK, maybe it's obvious most of us aren't so flippant when it comes to our jobs, but is it an important issue to address? Do you notice a drop in patient care, or overall care, with added distractions?

Does your unit/place of work have criteria in place to prevent the use of personal electronic devices while on duty?